Shawnee Names for Native Nations and Peoples

HOME

Names for non-Algonquian nations and peoples (including Europeans and racial groups).
Go here for Algonquian names of tribes.

 

 

II. Muskogean:

 

 

Creek, Muskoge:

Homashko,

Homashkooki

 

Omashkoki

homashko, pl. homashkoki

homashko, homashkooki

 

NOTES: noomashkoowaatowe 'I speak Creek'; homashkoowithiii 'Creek River (now Verdigris River)'. Perhaps mooshky- 'withdraw from water': nimoshkina 'I withdrew it out of the water' (SS:362).

 

Alibama:

*Halipamewileni

 

alipamewileni

 

 

NOTES:

 

Seminole:

Shimanooli,

Shimanooliiki

 

shiminoli, pl. shiminoliki

shimanooli

 

NOTES: shimanooliiwilenaweeki 'Seminole People' (SS:317). Gatschet provides the plural form.

 

Choctaw:

Cha'ta,

Cha'taki

Cha'taki

cha'ta, pl. chataki

cha'ta, cha'tee-

 

NOTES: cha'taki 'Choctaw individuals'; cha'teewaatowe 'he speaks Choctaw'. Voegelin has a variant stem form in composition, but the evidence from the Prophet and Gatschet yields the forms given here. This is supported by the form in Voegelin's unpublished grammar: cha'ta.

 

Chickasaw:

Chiikasha,

Chiikashaki

Chiksaki

chikasha, pl. chikashaki

chiikasha, chiikashee-

 

NOTES: chikashaki 'Chickasaw individuals' (SS:147); chiikasheewaatowe 'he speaks Chickasaw'.

 

 

III. Caddoan:

 

 

Pawnee:

Pani,

Paniiki or

Paniyathaki

Paniathaki

pani, paniki; hopanali 'insides'

 

 

NOTES: Gatchet suggests hopanali 'insides (liver, lungs)'. Voegelin has 'pani 'vulva'? Was the Gatschet's source being delicate or humorous? Perhaps a folk etymology.

 

Wichita:

Wiichita,

Wiichitaatha

 

wichita, pl. -ki

wiichitaa- 'Wichita tribe', wiichitaatha 'Wichita individual'.

 

NOTE: wiichitaawaatowe 'he speaks Wichita'.

 

Caddo:

Kalahalachi,

Kalahalachiki

 

kalahalachi, kalahalachiki

 

 

NOTE: Gatschet has keto, ketoki crossed out with the above form written after it.

 

 

IV. Iroquoian. The Shawnee are not entirely clear on the names of their old enemies and overlords in the East as their terms do not reflect the tribes and divisions of the original Iroquoian confederacy. Some names are merged, probably due to political or language conditions after removal to the west. A term for the Oneida has not been found.

 

 

Iroquois:

Nikotwa'thwi

shkotewachi

Nikotiwathwi shkotawachi

 

 

 

NOTES: nekotewathwi shkotawachi 'six fires': nekotwa'thwi 'six' + shkote 'fire'; The Iroquois Confederacy consisted of five nations (Mohawk, Onandaga, Oneida, Seneca, and Cayuga) until the early 17th century when the Tuscarora fled from North Carolina and were added as the sixth fire. The Mohawks, Onodaga, and Seneca were the 'Elder Brothers' of the confederacy.

 

Mohawk, Caughnawaga, Cayuga:

ka'nawaaki,

ka'nawaakiki

 

ka'newakiki 'Conewagas'

kanawaki or kanhawaki 'Mohawk, Cayuga'.

ka'nawaaki, ka'nawaakiki 'Mohawk'

 

NOTES: nika'nawaakiiwaatowe 'I speak Mohawk'; the word is also used of an old band of the Delaware, now absorbed into other Delaware bands (SS:305). Also spelled Conewago and variants. The Cayuga were 'younger brothers' of the Mohawks, Onondaga, and Seneca. Apparently, the Shawnee from 1924 onward referred to these groups with the same name.

 

Onoandaga:

*Honondaki?

 

onondaki ?

 

 

NOTES: Gatschet, our only source, is not sure of this one

 

Seneca, Wyandot, Wyandotte:

Naatowe,

Naatoweeki or

Naatoweethaki

Natoweki 'Senecas'; natowethaki 'Wyandots'

natwe'tha, pl. -ki 'Wyandot'

naatowe, pl. naatoweeki or naatoweethaki 'Seneca, Wyandotte'

 

NOTES: tutele, pl. tuteleki; tuteletha, nom. pr.; Gatschet notes they are merged with Seneca. Naatowe 'Seneca, Wyandotte (tribe or individual), naatoweeki beside naatoweethaki 'the Seneca, the Wyandotte';. ninaatoweewaatowe 'I speak Seneca' (SS:377). Wyandot refers to the "Absentee" group in Kansas, while Wyandotte refers to the federally recognized group in Oklahoma. the Wyandot and Huron are the same people.

 

Oneida

No source for this tribe.

 

Cayuga

(See Mohawk)

See Mohawk. Gatschet is the only source and he has the same name for the Cayuga and the Mohawk.

 

Nottaway:

Natwe,

Natweeki

 

natwe, natweki

 

 

NOTES:

 

Tuscarora:

Tashkaloono,

Tashkaloonooki

 

tashkalono, pl. -ki

Tashkaloono (SG)

 

NOTES: Gatschet had an informant who knew a man, then deceased, who was Tuscarora, but passed as a Wyandot.

 

Cherokee:

Kato'hwa,

Kato'hwaaki

katawhaki

katowa, pl. katowaki

kato'hwa, kato'hwaaki

 

NOTES: nikato'hwaawaatowe 'I speak Cherokee' (SS:291). The term is possibly related to kot-, koch- 'undereground' (meaning uncertain)' (SS:292): kotawaalakwi, kotawaalako 'cave, caves'. It was the name the Shawnee gave the Cherokee on one of Franquelin's maps on what appears to be the upper Cumberland River.

 

 

V. Siouan

 

 

Sioux:

Shaha,

Shahaaki

 Nantowethiki ?

shaha, pl. shahaki

shaha, shahaaki

 

NOTE: nishahaawaatowe 'I speak Sioux'. Trowbridge, as he notes, gives a name similar to the Wyandot. It is at variance with the other sources.

 

Crow, Absaroka:

Kakale ?