Copyright 2007 Vision ePublications. All Rights Reserved.
 
All works on this website are the property of the authors. No portion may be reproduced in any form without express permission of the author.

VISION EPUBLICATIONS is registered as a Business Entity in the State of Oregon, No. 444738-90.
 
Publisher
Noel Schutz
Co-publisher
Judy Wu
 
I'm Noel. I am an associate professor at National Chi Nan University, Puli, Taiwan. I was born in St. Louis, Missouri where my Dad's National Guard unit was called up at the beginning of WWII so I spent my youth as an army brat all around America. Dad served with the 1st Cav Division in Korea and we joined him in Hokkaido, Japan when the 1st Cav was redeployed there.
    Shortly after, I joined the U.S. Air Force to become a Korean War era vet serving in Tripoli, Libya and Austin, Texas. After my discharge, I studied at Indiana University under the well-known linguist the late Carl Voegelin at received my  Ph.D. in Native  American linguistics and anthropology (Ph.D. dissertation: The Study of Shawnee Myths in an Ethnolinguistic and Ethnohistorical  Perspective  - 1975).
   I've taught at Reed College.the University of Oregon, the University of  South Florida (Tampa), San Jose State Univerisity, and National Central University and National Chi Nan University in Taiwan. I spend a great deal of my career in the field of English as a Second Language (ESL),  teaching for the U.S. Air Force at Air Univeristy (Montgomery, AL) and Jeddah, Saudi  Arabia as well as directing English language institutes in Washington, D.C., Miami and Tampa, FL, Santa Monica and San Francisco, CA, and Eugene, OR. I've published over two dozen articles and monographs. I opened a website on the Shawnee to put my unpublished stuff out therer: http://www.shawnee-traditions.com.
   I am also a proud  veteran of the civil rights movement in Alabama. I became involved in 1968 after the assassination of Martin Luther  King while in Montgomery, Alabama. There I was previledged to work with many of  the founders of the Civil Rights movement and with such illustrious folks as E.D. Nixon, Mrs. Carr, and the late Clifford and Virginia Durr. In 1968 I becqame campaign manager for a Black candidate for Congress in the old district that included Montgomery County, testified on Black Power in Alabama before the McGovern Commission on Party Reform in Meridian, Mississippi, supported the NDPA that challenged the Wallace Democrats at the Miami Dem convention (drafted a speech Julian Bond gave on behalf of our challenge delegation), and the research for the redistricting suit brought by a friend, Morris Dees of the Southern Poverty Law Center. 
   I stay on campus during the week days teaching Engish, Creative Writing and sometimes English literature. On weekends and holidays I stay in our home in the mountains. This is the time we work on the novels and work in the family properties.
   I have two grown sons in Florida who have blessed me with a granddaughter and two grandsons. In Taiwan we raise Judy's nephew as our own.
  
My name is Judy Wu.  I have worked with Noel for many years to complete these epic fantasy novels, yet all that we wished to convey could not be compressed between the covers of the books.
  I like this picture of Elandriel as a young girl because it reminds me of my own childhood. I can understand the loneliness and frustration she felt as she looked out on her homeland. Within her soul, she longed for the new life to come to lift her from this world of shadows.
   I was born to in the native Formosan tribe of the Bunun (Austronesian) in the mountains of central Taiwan as a member of an indigenous tribe under a dominant foreign culture (Chinese).
   When I almost died at six months of age, I was baptized as Eve in the Protestant faith. My father complained that my mother stayed in church all day while he worked his head off alone in the fields (because the Protestants had services morning and afternoon). But since the Catholics had their service only in the morning, my mother decided to join them. So I was baptized again as Mary in the Catholic Church. My father, who was a renowned shaman, limited his arts to healing after he became a Christian.
   I grew up in a beautiful mountain valley with two lovely sisters and three brothers at a time when it took all day on foot on forest trails to get to the nearest town.
   My church was my inspiration and I never missed a single service when a faithful Maryknoll missionary would come to the village on foot. After I grew up I always sought out a church wherever I was whether in Taiwan or in the U.S. to nurture my soul.
   I spent over a dozen years in the states, but in 1989 I felt called to return to my village to undertake an independent--and admittedly a mystic-mission that I am still engaged in. I am at the point where I wish to retire from this endless work and live a normal life. So far, this dream has eluded me.
   I enjoy reading, especially about people who improve their lives and renew their faith in God. Once you find God, you also find out who you really are and you begin to cherish your life and both appreciate and be content with what you have in this world.
   This life lasts only a wink, but what is important is that this is the place where we plant the roots of our spiritual life so our soul can bloom into what we will truly become in the Kingdom of God.
   It is my comfort and consolation to know that there are many people in the world out there who have been fortunate enough to have placed their hope in God's hands
  I find this inspiration in reading, but in my daily life here I see so few who choose to tread this path.

Judy K. L. Wu has been a frequent LTTE contributer for two of the English language newspapers in Taiwan. You can read a couple of her essay's on Selected Essays of Judy Wu on this  site. The following can be also read online from the newspaper: Unheard Cries of Dispair.
About VeP
Vision e-Publications is about
the vision of Internet publishing

No agents, no editors, no publishers, no advertisers. Just you, the reader, and us, Noel and Judy. We write what we please, we use the typefaces we want, we put pictures in the text, we may break grammar rules that hinder our modes of expression, we can ignore stylistic conventions that hamper our spirits, and we might even put captions under the titles of each chapter like old-fashioned novels of another age. In short, we are free from the intervention of the layers people found in paper publishing that determine who will be published and what topics will be chosen. Further they determine the titles, the format and every other aspects of publishing that effectively erect barriers between the author and his or her readers.

Beyond that, this site also offers a unique opportunity for authors and readers to collaborate in the creative process. Paper publishing has led us to accept the limitations of paper production where by its nature once a work has been published it is immutable, fixed in concrete, somehow a static entity that cannot grow beyond its final manuscript except in the remote possibility it is popular enough to merit an eventual revised edition.

The Internet allows us break these artificial bonds and make it possible for writers and readers to enter into a unique collaboration where author and readers jointly, through dialogue (on the Forum and Weblog on this site), help modify a work in a dynamic interaction that melds the imaginative minds of the fantasy author with those of the readers. In this way, an ultimate story of a world of wonder that would be beyond the capacity of a lone author can spring into being. Readers are emancipated from dependency to become virtual colleagues in the creative process.

This means that instead of new revised editions there can be frequent updating of works to incorporate the suggestions of readers. While the author still reserves the right to keep anything as he damn well pleases, he or she has the option of embracing the readership in making the work a better story more pleasing to its readership as well as more satisfying to the author.

Kind of cool, huh? Well, we'll see how it works out. Authors do have the perogative of being, well, the authors! So the ultimate choices are in their hands. But still the input from readers is certainly valuable and can improve and enliven the stories.

I have nothing against agents, editors or publishers. I love the world of books. I like few things better than to buy a new book, take it home and reserve it for a special time to crack the covers. I love browsing the stacks and randomly picking up treasures from that vast horde of works. But with the burgeoning resovoir of authors, conventional publishing faces a momentous task of sifting through to find what they believe will be publishable material. Since they have to make a buck, that consideration is prominent. I have also had the  distinct displeasure of having two agents who turned out to be dishonest, to say the least. One couple got jail time and the other went on the lamb. No fun there! But other than my bad fortune, most publishers are decent and they offer a much wider distribution and the added advantage of advertisement and outlets in stores. So get a little, lose a little in Internet digital publishing.

What Internet publishing by authors does offer is a middle ground. Authors can find out for themselves the direct reaction of the reading public (howbeit a select Internet one) and work with them to make it a better work. Perhaps eventually such works may find a publisher and that is well and good. There is no campaign to eliminate paper publishing here only to find way to get the stuff out to readers directly, cheaply and conveniently.

The first works up is a trilogy of novels called The Gondawyn Apocalypse three mystic tales about an amazing woman named Elandriel that Judy and I began writing around 1993 and have revised about a gazillion times. So here it is presented to the public warts and all for their pleasure or discontent.
This and that..

Vision ePublications will be having webpages for its editors, administrators and authors as time moves on. Now you can read Judy Wu's page here and Don Greene's page here. To interact with these folks go to the Forum and find a thread on the person you are interested in or start a thread of your own.

VeP currently makes its eBooks available in Adobe Acrobat format (pdf files). There are good reasons for doing this. First of all, Adobe Readers may be downloaded for free quickly and easily.  Second, it  recreates the format VeP designed nearly exactly. Third, it can be read on both PCs  and MACs as well as on various readers. Our Adobe PDF eBooks are designed for Adobe Acrobat Reader. They can be viewed and printed with all operating systems, including Macintosh, Windows, Linux, and Unix. Page navigation, multiple viewing options, bookmarks, and search features are included. Adobe Portable Document Format (PDF) is the open de facto standard for electronic distribution worldwide.